09-09-22

5 Best Cars for Winter in Canada

There are many reasons to love winter in Canada, but driving on icy or snow-packed roads may not be one of them. When you need to dig out your car and make it to work after a massive snowstorm, you'll want to have a vehicle you can trust to get the job done. Whether you prefer to drive an all-wheel-drive sedan or a powerhouse pickup truck, there's a winter-friendly vehicle to fit your needs, lifestyle, and budget. Here are five of the best cars you can drive during the winter in Canada.

 

Chevrolet Silverado

It's no secret that pickup trucks typically outperform smaller vehicles in severe winter weather. Chevrolet's flagship truck, the Silverado, can get you where you need to go, even during a severe snowstorm. This powerful truck offers a range of engine options, including a 3.0-litre turbo-diesel engine designed for optimal performance and maximum efficiency. This engine produces 460 lb-ft of torque and can tow up to 13,300 pounds. With the Silverado's impressive towing capabilities, you can even hook up a snowplow to clear your street after a brutal snowstorm. Choose a Silverado with four-wheel drive for enhanced traction on slippery roads.

The Chevrolet Silverado also comes loaded with advanced safety and driver assistance features to keep you safe on winter roads. New models come standard with Chevy Safety Assist, which includes features such as forward collision alert, automatic emergency braking, lane keep assist, and automatic high-beam headlights. These features can help improve your visibility and prevent potential collisions while driving in poor conditions.

Subaru Outback

With standard all-wheel drive, the Subaru Outback is a winter-ready SUV. Subaru's Symmetrical All-Wheel-Drive system provides optimized traction in snow or rain by evaluating real-time data to deliver power continuously to all four wheels. When one wheel slips, the system automatically transfers power to the wheels with the best grip on the road. Newer Outback models also come standard with 8.7 inches of ground clearance to help you drive in deep snow. You can get most trims with additional features to keep you comfortable in colder weather, including heated front seats and dual-zone climate control.

The Subaru Outback comes equipped with standard safety features to help you drive on winter roads. These features include automatic high-beam assist, lane departure and sway warning, automatic emergency steering, and pre-collision braking. Depending on the Outback you choose, optional safety features may be available, such as blind-spot detection with lane change assist.

Toyota Camry

If you prefer the handling and efficiency of a sedan, get one that can handle winter conditions. The Toyota Camry is a good bet if you choose a model with available all-wheel drive. When the system senses the front wheels slipping, it sends torque to the rear wheels, which helps the car maintain its grip in rain or snow. Newer versions of the Camry offer two impressive engine options, or you can choose a hybrid version with a four-cylinder engine and electric motor, which produce a combined 208 net horsepower.

Other helpful winter features in the Toyota Camry include LED headlights and dual-zone climate control. Some models may come with an available cold weather package, which includes heated seats, a heated steering wheel, and heated power outside mirrors with blind-spot warning indicators. Newer models come standard with advanced safety features, including a pre-collision system with pedestrian detection, lane departure alert with steering assist, road sign assist, dynamic radar cruise control, and automatic high beams. These features can help you feel confident when driving on wintry roads.

Chevrolet Tahoe

For a full-size SUV that can handle snowy roads, choose a Chevrolet Tahoe. New models come with available four-wheel drive to increase the SUV's grip on slippery or uneven roads. The SUV also has several engine options, delivering up to 420 horsepower and 460 lb-ft of torque. The Chevy Tahoe has impressive ground clearance, and on some models, an air ride adaptive suspension can even adjust the SUV's height to increase clearance depending on the road conditions.

The Chevy Tahoe also comes with other features that make it a bit more bearable when you have to leave the house on a chilly winter day. New models come standard with tri-zone automatic climate control and remote start, so you can warm up the car before your trip. Rain-sensing wipers help keep your visibility clear, while LED headlights provide enhanced clarity during difficult conditions. Safety features in the new Chevrolet Tahoe include forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking, lane keep assist, following distance indicator, and automatic high-beam assist.

Jeep Grand Cherokee

Jeep has a well-deserved reputation for making cars to withstand tough conditions, and the Grand Cherokee is no exception. The Grand Cherokee comes standard with an off-road capable four-wheel-drive system, providing maximum traction in any weather condition. On newer models, an available traction management system allows you to choose from different modes based on road conditions, including snow. Dual-zone climate control comes standard in newer Grand Cherokee models, and most trims offer heated front seats to keep you warm and comfortable on days when the outside temperatures dip below zero.

The Jeep Grand Cherokee comes loaded with safety and convenience features to protect you on snow-packed roads. Driver assistance features include forward collision warning with active braking, active lane management, blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-path detection, and high-beam assist. Optional safety features that can help you navigate difficult roads include a surround-view camera and night vision with infrared sensors.

Winter is just around the corner, so now is the perfect time to purchase a winter-friendly vehicle to get you through the season. Whether you are looking for a Chevrolet Silverado or Tahoe, or one of our used vehicles, at Jim Tubman Chevrolet, we offer a wide selection of new and pre-owned cars, trucks, and SUVs, including many models with all-wheel or four-wheel drive. Browse our online inventory or stop by our dealership for a test drive. If you're not ready for a new car, our service centre can help get your current vehicle ready for a Canadian winter. Give us a call or contact us for more information. We look forward to seeing you soon.

2019 Silverado by Truck Hardware is licensed with CC BY 2.0

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09-01-22

2022 Chevy Silverado vs. 2022 Ford F-150

The competition between Ford and Chevy has been the most prolonged in the auto world. The brands' full-size pickups battle for the annual sales crown. But which of the two should you buy? This 2022 Ford F-150 vs. Chevy Silverado 1500 comparison will give you the answer you seek. Each pickup truck has several configurations ranging from a luxurious family hauler to a no-frills work truck. Once you have identified what feature matters most, you will be ready to choose from one of the two trucks.

 

Pricing

 

The Ford F-150 comes in seven trims of varying body styles and lengths. The MSRP price for the no-frills base model XL starts at $29,640, the XLT starts at $35,750, while the more upscale Lariat trim starts at $45,760. The luxury trims are a bit pricey, with King Ranch starting at $56,230, Platinum at $59,010, and Limited at $73,455.

The 2022 Chevy Silverado comes in an option of Work Truck, Custom, LT, Trail Boss, RST, LTZ, and High Country. The Work Truck (WT) is the base model, and MSRP starts at $31,500. The more luxurious LT starts at $42,600 with RWD or $44,700 with 4WD. At Jim Tubman Chevrolet, we prefer the LT trim with a fancier interior and the customizable option to include a crew cab with a standard length for maximum passenger and cargo space.

Engine and Transmission

The 2022 F-150 has several engine options: a 3.0-liter diesel V-6 with 250-hp; a twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter V-6 with 400-hp; a twin turbo-charged 2.7-liter V-6 with 325-hp; a 5.0-liter V-8 with 400-hp; and a 3.3-liter with 290-hp. All these engines are paired with a 10-speed auto transmission. A hybrid powertrain is also available, which consists of a 3.5-liter twin-turbo V-6 and 400 horsepower and 10-speed auto transmission.

The Chevy Silverado is available in a turbocharged four-cylinder, a Duramax 3.0-liter inline-six, and two V-8s. Each trim has agile handling, and the brake pedals provide a firm and reassuring grip. If you are looking for a more rugged Silverado, the Trail Boss would be a good choice. It has a 2.0-inch lift and gnarly wheels that make off-roading more accessible and fun.

Fuel Economy and MPG

The Silverado is not fuel efficient, but some of its powertrain options are more efficient than others. The diesel engine, which comes as an option, is the most economical, with up to 23 mpg and 33 mpg for city and highway, respectively. With the AWD, the highway ratings drop to 26 mpg city. The gas-fueled turbo-four AWD is rated at 20 mpg and 22mpg for city and highway, respectively. The 5.3-liter V-8 AWD powertrain is rated at 16 mpg and 22 mpg for city and highway, respectively.

As for the Ford F-150, EPA estimates the turbocharged 2.7-liter V-6 to have 20 mpg in the city and 26 mpg on the highway. The twin-turbo 3.5-liter V-6 is rated at 18 mpg city and 24 mpg highway. The hybrid trim estimates 25 mpg and 26 mpg on city and highway, respectively.

Towing and Payload Capacity

The F-150's base 3.3-liter V-6 engine has a maximum towing capacity of about 8,200 pounds. Trims with the twin-turbo 3.5-liter V-6 can tow up to 14,000 pounds. If you opt for the 5.0-liter V-8, the maximum towing capacity will be 13,000 pounds. The diesel V-6 can tow up to 12,100 and the hybrid up to 12,700 pounds. The F-15 has a payload capacity that averages between 1,840 and 3,250 pounds.

The Chevy Silverado has a maximum towing capacity of 13,300 pounds. The top towing rate is available with the 6.2-liter V-8 and the diesel engines. The 5.3-liter engine can haul as much as 11,500 pounds, while models with the turbocharged four-cylinder can haul up to 9,500 pounds. The Silverado has a payload ranging between 1,870 and 2,280 pounds.

Interior and Cargo Space

The interior of the F-150 nearly matches the Ram 1500's cabin, especially in the higher-end Limited, Platinum, and King Ranch models. The cabin is covered in quality materials, and there is plenty of storage cubes. Additional convenience features, including a folding gearshift, 14 power outlets, and speakers in the headrests, are included to make things easier for those that use the F-150 as a mobile workspace. Passenger space is sufficient, with the four-door crew cab having the largest space and being more family-friendly. The Ford also has an optional onboard generator that provides up to 7.2 kW of power.

The base models of the Silverado offer only the essentials, including manually adjustable front seats, vinyl seats, manual locks, and windows. The luxury trims starting from the LT trim have a significantly better cabin, thanks to an improved dashboard design with 12.8-inch digital gauge clusters and a large center touch screen. The crew cab can feature an enormous rear seat with ample headroom. The Silverado is a practical vehicle with large storage cubes spread throughout the cabin.

Connectivity and Infotainment

Ford includes an 8.0-inch infotainment display as standard on all models, but there is a 12.0-inch unit that comes as an option. Wi-Fi hotspots, Android Auto, and Apple CarPlay are also standard. SiriusXM radio, navigation, and Bang & Olufsen stereo systems are optional. Ford's Sync 4's new software offers weather and traffic updates through the optional navigation system, over-the-air updates for future software releases, and onboard telematics to help in keeping track of the vehicle use and location for fleet customers.

Chevy equips every Silverado with a touch screen infotainment system that supports Android Auto, Apple CarPlay, and mobile hotspot. The physical buttons and knobs make operating the system hassle-free, and the screen responds promptly to touch. The upper trims from LT have enhanced features, including Google-powered voice assistant, wireless Android Auto, Apple CarPlay, and Amazon Alexa integration.

Ford and Chevy offer a series of trucks that compete favorably against each other. Chevy Silverado provides its customers an advantage with its large display screen, ample storage space, advanced tech features like the Google-powered voice assist, and wired Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. On the other hand, Ford boasts an enormous towing capacity, fuel economy, and a reasonable price value.

If you are looking for a truck for work or family use, you can trust us at Jim Tubman Chevrolet to offer you the best deal. Our inventory of used and new vehicles has some of the best offers you can find in the market. Visit us or call us today and get to drive your favorite truck.

 

Image by Stefan Rodriguez is licensed with Unsplash License

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04-11-18

CHEVROLET’S SILVERADO 2500 HD IS ONE SMART TRUCK

Silverado

By Jil McIntosh, Driving.ca - In the world of truck advertising, torque and towing are kings.  It's an all-out war and there are some pretty impressive numbers out there, but there's more to a truck than just pound-feet and how much it can pull.

Those biggest numbers belong to the heavy-duty trucks - three-quarter-ton (2500/250) and one-ton (3500/350) - and I had the Chevrolet Silverado 2500.  The heavy-duty Silverado models, and their mechanically-identical GMC Sierra siblings, start with a 6.0-litre V8 gasoline engine making 360 horsepower and 330 pound-feet of torque.

My chariot carried the optional Duramax 6.6-L V8 turbodiesel engine, which ups the ante to 445 hp and 910 lb-ft of torque.  It's not a cheap upgrade; the engine is an additional $10,430 and it hooks exclusively to an Allison six-speed automatic transmission, priced separately at $1,445.  The Silverado 2500 starts at $42,070 for the Regular Cab 4x2 in Work Truck trim, while my Crew Cab 4x4 LTZ tester began at $63,065 with gas engine.

Adding the optional diesel engine and transmission, along with such options as a Midnight Edition black-out accent package, power sunroof and Z71 off-road package, brought it to $80,005 before freight and taxes.  In a nutshell, trucks ain't cheap anymore.

An all-new Silverado 1500 half-ton is coming for 2019, completely redone from the tires up.  The new heavy-duty versions usually lag at least a year or two behind, so expect the current-generation 2500 and 3500 to hang in for a while.

The Silverado's 445 hp and 910 lb-ft of torque slots in between archrivals Ford F-250, with a 6.7L Power Stroke diesel that makes 450 hp and 935 lb-ft of torque, and the Ram 2500, with a 6.7-L Cummins engine that cranks out 370 hp and 800 lb-ft of torque.  That's about it for your choices in this segment.  Toyota doesn't make a heavy-duty Tundra, while Nissan offers the Titan XD, a truck it says bridges the gap between half- and three-quarter-ton models, and with an available 5.0 L Cummins that makes 555 lb-ft of torque.

As for towing, turn off the TV when the oversized numbers start rolling up.  Tow ratings are a complicated science, and whenever an automaker promises you'll be able to haul an apartment building off its foundation, that's the very top number for specific truck configurations with a specific type of hitch.  It goes without saying, but I'll say it anyway: Buy the truck that best matches your trailer.

I recently towed and hauled with all of the Detroit Three heavy-duty trucks in back-to-back testing, and all of them get the job done without fuss, but I give the nod ahead to the Chevy.  That Duramax-Allison combination is a match made in heaven; acceleration is smooth and linear with a heavy load, and braking is confidence inspiring.  The Silverado's exhaust brake sound is nowhere near as much fun as the Ram's booming hey-good-buddy-we-got-a-convoy blatt, but it does a good job of slowing everything down on deceleration.

All of these big trucks are meant to look intimidating, and the Silverado plays the part with its huge domed hood and squared-off styling (beauty is in the eye of the beholder and all that, but I think the GMC Sierra is better looking).  At the back, GM uses a simple step into the bumper ends that's absolutely brilliant: Put your foot in, grab the handhold in the box side, and pull yourself up (and you need it, because trucks these days are needlessly oversized).  Ford gives you a tailgate-mounted step that works well, but requires you to pull it out and set it up, while Ram offers nothing more than a sliver of rubber-topped bumper when the tailgate's down, and I'm terrified that my toe will slip and my knee will slam into the edge on my way down.

Still, not everything on the Chevy seems as smart as its step.  The front bumper is cut out to provide airflow for the intercooler, but without a protective mesh over it, it looks vulnerable to stones and debris.  Meanwhile, the diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) tank sits lot under the passenger-side rocker, waiting for a driver to bump over a tall curb.  The stock mirrors are also too small for the truck's size.  Why make a fuss over what it can pull, and then expect customers to pay $450 for optional towing mirrors?

The interior is a nice place to be, and the Silverado features supportive seats, a roomy second row with fold-up seats for extra storage, large centre storage console, and controls that are easy to use, even when you're wearing gloves.  And unfortunately you are likely to have them on in this truck.  While it sounds like a needless luxury, heated steering wheels are the new gotta-have-it feature, especially on a truck where the idea, at least in theory, involves some work outdoors in the cold.  The top-trim High Country has one, but not this LTZ tester, and it's a glaring omission on something that costs 80 grand.

Heavy-duty diesels are seldom an impulse buy, but if it's your first one, remember that in addition to the engine's initial stiff cost, it's also more expensive to service.  So ignore the big numbers in the ads and instead consider your needs, and buy appropriately.

Overview: Chevrolet's entry in the tow-and-torque wars

Pros: Impressive engine and transmission combination, simple box step, nice interior

Cons: A few missing items, considering its trim level

Value for money: Good

What I would change: Give it bigger mirrors

How I would spec it: LT trim; it is one step below, but still lots of stuff

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2016 SilveradoTHE SILVERADO'S BOXY STYLING IS SUBTLY UPDATED FOR 2016,
MAKING IT A HANDSOME BEAST.

By Lesley Wimbush, Driving.ca - When you live in the city, it's easy to dismiss pickup trucks as being over-compensating gas-guzzlers, hauling air while hogging most of the road.  To truly appreciate the beauty of a good truck, you've got to experience it in its own environment.  And there's nothing like 10 kilometres of unplowed cottage road to make a four-wheel-drive truck seem as attractive as any premium German sedan.

The unpaved road north of Apsley would've been completely impassable in any but the toughest of all-wheel-drive cars.  Heavy snow through the forest gave way to patches of yellow mud in the clearings, warmed by the sun and thick as gumbo.  Treacherously greasy, it sucked and pulled the wheels of the 2016 Chevrolet Silverado, skewing us sideways down the slick incline.

When we ground to a halt, bogged down to the running boards and flanks spackled with muck flung by the spinning rear wheels, it was time for intervention.  Switching to 4-LO engages the heavy duty locking differential, and with power driving all four wheels, we easily shook free of the mud and continued on our way.

Canadians bought more than 46,000 Chevrolet Silverados last year; it's one of the most important products in GM's portfolio.  For 2016, the Silverado receives a couple of important changes to help it stay competitive in a field that includes a fully revised Ford F150 and the Ram 1500, with its popular coil spring and air suspension.

The Silverado's boxy styling is subtly updated for 2016, with new trim-specific grilles and LED head and tail lamps, while upper trim levels get segment-first LED fog lights.  Divided by a strong, horizontal bar, the truck's new face appears wider, and a revised hood gives it a stronger, more muscular look.

Perhaps more important than the external changes is the increased use of GM's eight-speed transmission, which is now available with the 5.3-litre V-8 engine on LTZ and High Country models.  It's a big improvement on the six-speed, providing quicker torque delivery, faster acceleration and better fuel economy.

The Silverado is a handsome beast, particularly in my tester's LTZ trim, which eschews chrome bling for a more subtle look.  Running boards finish off the look nicely, and corner bumper steps provide easy access to the bed.  I particularly liked the "EZ Lift and Lower" tailgate, which can be locked remotely, keeping cargo safe beneath the tri-fold tonneau cover.

The cabin retains its blunt and chunky design, with most of the changes centred on technology.  The crew cab is an enormously roomy environment, and even the rear seats have enough legroom for a pro basketball player.  The flat and boxy centre console has plenty of cubby space, and a gigantic storage area beneath the armrest.

The eight-inch colour touch screen now features Apple CarPlay and Android Auto and there's on-board 4G LTE Wi-Fi and wireless cellphone charging.

Safety systems include adaptive cruise control, lane-keep assist, driver's safety-alert seat, and a rear-view camera.  There's a heated steering wheel and front seats are heated and ventilated.  Surprisingly, given the amount of sophisticated technology, there's no push-button start, even in this upper-trim-level tester.

Although you never forget that you're driving a very large vehicle, the Silverado is well mannered and very quiet, with a minimum of road and wind noise.  While the lane-keeping assist initially feels rather intrusive, it doesn't take long to appreciate its ability to keep the big truck within the lines.  Combined with adaptive cruise control, it takes a lot of stress out of commuting in congested traffic.

The big V-8 features active cylinder management, which shuts down four cylinders during light load for better fuel efficiency.  It's smooth and seamless, with only the TFT display informing you that the truck is operating as a four-cylinder.

Steering is very good, with the right amount of heft for a vehicle this size, but having separate adjusters for tilting and telescoping the column is confusing.

Apple CarPlay is literally plug and play; tethering an iPhone instantly launches the application and it's ready for hands-free messaging.  But the Bluetooth system had the annoying habit of occasionally interrupting the audio system to make contact with my phone.

The Silverado Z71 is a formidable off-roader, with Rancho shocks, transfer case, locking differential and underbody shields.  Equipped with the Max Tow package, it's capable of towing up to 11,000 pounds (4,990 kilograms), which is less than the F-150's 12,200 lbs. (5,535 kg) but just over the Ram 1500's max rating of 10,800 lbs (4,900 kg).

Although the Silverado is up against some stiff competition with the Ram's cushy, self-leveling air suspension, and the F-150's slick new trailer backing-up technology, there's a lot to like about this smooth and capable pickup truck.

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